Knee Pain

Knee Pain

knee-pain

 

Patello-femoral Pain Syndrome

Patello-femoral Pain Syndrome is a general term used to describe knee pain in and around the patella, and is usually to do with how the patella (knee cap) tracks in relation the femur (thigh bone) when the knee is moved through range. The patella sits in groove at the bottom of the femur known as the femoral groove, and is held in place by the quadriceps and patella tendons.
PFPS can occur with no definite cause, and is very common in all age groups, although occurs more often in women than men. The pain will usually be reported during running and other weight-bearing actions such as stair-climbing, lunges and squats. Prolonged sitting can also aggravate. The pain typically presents as a dull, diffuse ache, and there may be clicking, swelling, locking or a feeling of giving-way.

A thorough clinical examination is required to determine the contributing factors of PFPS which may include weak muscles on one side of the knee or around the hip, tight structures around the hip or knee, foot position, and patella position. The goal of physiotherapy is to correct any biomechanical problem, reduce pain, and restore correct patella-tracking to ensure a reduced risk of re-injury.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one of the four main stabilizing ligaments of the knee, running forwards from the back of the femur (thigh bone) to the top of the tibia (shin bone). The role of the ACL is to prevent the tibia moving forward from underneath the femur, and to stabilize the knee during rotational forces.

A ruptured or torn ACL is common in the sporting population and usually occurs when the person is landing from a jump, changing direction quickly, or decelerating suddenly. An ACL injury can also occur from direct contact like a tackle in football. The patient will often describe a loud “pop” or “crack”, coupled with intense pain and swelling of the knee. Most ACL injuries occur in combination with meniscal tears, cartilage injuries or Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries.

In the early stages after injury, it is important to follow the RICE protocol of Rest, Ice, Compression and elevation. Your physiotherapist or GP may recommend an X-ray to exclude any fractures, and an MRI to confirm an ACL rupture or other tissue damage. If there is a damage that requires surgery, your physiotherapist will organize an appointment with an orthopaedic surgeon. Some patients elect to not have surgery, and can often regain full function and strength of the knee. Surgery is usually recommended if the patient is wanting to return to contact sports, or sport that involves pivoting and twisting.

 

Meniscus Injury

The soft, rubbery menisci lie on top of the tibia (shin bone) and they help stabilize the knee, act as a shock absorber, and lubricate the knee joint. There is a medial (inside) meniscus and a lateral (outside) meniscus, and injury to either or both of these usually occurs through a twisting action when the foot is fixed, or through degenerative changes. Damage to the meniscus can increase the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis.

Tears in the meniscus can be small or significant, but as they have poor blood supply, they rarely heel without intervention. Patients with a meniscal tear report clicking, locking or giving-way of the knee, and there is often pain with twisting during weight-bearing. It is common to have swelling and stiffness in the knee joint.

Small tears can usually be managed with rest and physiotherapy which may involve taping of the knee, strengthening, etc. Larger tears may require arthroscopic (keyhole) surgery to either repair or trim the meniscus.

Call us on 9251 5111, email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   or click here to arrange an appointment with one of our experienced Physiotherapists today

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Pitt St. City Practice

Address:
Level 7 60 Pitt Street Sydney 2000
Hours of Operation:
Mon - Fri 7:30am - 6:00pm
Telephone:
(02) 9251-5111

King Street Practice

Address:
Fitness First - The Zone / 94 King Street Sydney 2000
Hours of Operation:
Mon - Fri 7:30am - 6:00pm
Telephone:
(02) 9251-5111